16 Ways to Fast Track Your Way to Success

These 16 steps will show you the way to successHave you ever wondered how some people seem to move from one success to the other?

Have you ever wanted freedom from the things that hold you back from success?  Can you imagine what life would be like without procrastination, self-doubt, and fatigue?

I have great news for you.  You can readily attain the success and good feelings you crave. They are available to all of us.

Below I’ve listed 16 steps you can take to lay the groundwork for your own eventual success.  Be patient with yourself as you guide yourself through the steps, as some of them may require you to change some long-held patterns.  You may feel doubtful or anxious when you make these shifts in behavior and mindset, but please remember, change tends to bring a little bit of anxiety with it.  Breathe through the anxiety and have confidence in the changes you are making for yourself.  Avoid trying to master all of the steps all at once.  One step at a time is a great way to travel.

16 Ways to Fast Track Your Way to Success

  1. Get enough sleep. Sleeping 7-9 hours per night will do the trick.
  2. Decide how you want to feel tomorrow and make your decisions based on that feeling.
  3. Speak up for what you need when you need it (or before).
  4. Be yourself.  When you are not being yourself, others will not be able to get a “read” on what you want.
  5. Don’t compare yourself with others.  Comparing yourself to others will slow you down unnecessarily.  It may block you from moving forward altogether.
  6. Eat healthy foods as often as possible.
  7. Set a priority.  Always orient yourself towards that priority until it’s done.
  8. Stretch yourself forward.  You can grow and change more than you think.  Anxiety has us thinking way too small.
  9. Connect with people who can help, guide, support, and encourage you.
  10. Think positively.  When we imagine success, it becomes easier to head for it and to see it when it arrives.
  11. Discard your feelings of guilt, worry, and shame.  They are not essential for working, playing, or living.  Orient yourself towards success.
  12. Stay connected to why you are doing what you are doing.  This will keep your focus strong and your motivation high.
  13. Plant seeds daily.  My friend and colleague Pamela Slim is the champion of this concept — connect with someone or act in a way today so that in a little while, you will see growth and engagement springing from that earlier connection or act. Growth comes from consistent, concerted effort.
  14. Avoid overdoing, perfecting, rehashing, and hyper-regretting.  The goal is to streamline our actions.
  15. Remember your creative power is already within you, part of you, waiting to be expressed.
  16. Celebrate every win.  When we forget to celebrate, we are essentially forgetting to be happy.  Celebrate each success.

I hope this list has given you the gift of get-up-and-go.  If it has, or if you are hoping for something a little more concrete to get you started, I invite you to use the same Garden of Seeds spreadsheet template which I use myself.  Trust me, it is a wonderful tool to have and to use.  Click the button below to get it in your own inbox ==>

Click Here to Receive the Garden of Seeds Template

Whichever strategy you choose to use, please remember to be kind to yourself.  If we do not feel well, we cannot do well.  External success is meaningless if it costs us our health and well-being.  Always make sure to take care of your mind, body, energy, and spirit.

Do you have any strategies for success that you would add to this list?  Please share them in the comments below.  If you feel this article might be helpful to someone you know, please share it with them.  Thank you.

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How to Get Back on Track after You’ve Lost Track of Time

Get past the interruptions and distractions

Are you wondering where your time has gone?  Even better, are you wondering what you can do to make sure you don’t lose any more time?  It can be very difficult to get back on track after an emergency or more general interruption occurs.  We can veer so far from our original intended actions.  The good news is, we can also learn how to protect ourselves from unexpected or unwanted time waste.

Instead of getting down on yourself and making it more difficult to feel motivated, have a set of strategies to cope with interruptions.  Coach yourself to restore your sense of focus and purpose as quickly as you can.

Here’s a quick list of 6 suggestions for how to get back on track after dealing with an interruption or distraction:

1.  Start by knowing what your general game plan is.  Before you start your day, sketch out a general game plan for how you would like things to progress.  I recommend you start with a copy of The Emergent Task Planner if you don’t already have a good system to organize and to track your daily activities.  Once you have an established plan in place, it should be easier to avoid disruptions and to get back into action if you face a blip in your plans.

2.   Figure out which factors tend to cause a break in your focus.  Is it boredom?      Working for too long?  Lack of sleep?  Too much alcohol last night?  Whatever the reason, note it well.  Devise a plan to reduce the occurrence, impact, and effect of these trigger factors when you need to get more things done.

3.   Accept and tolerate interruptions when they occur. Don’t add emotional drama to the existing drama of the event that caused you to go off course.  Life happens. Let it be.  Take a breath.  Start over again.  Also remember…just because other people are getting worked up does not mean you have to.  Stay the course.

4.   Lighten your schedule a bit if you can anticipate a series of interruptions or if you struggle with not being able to stay focused for very long.  Trim your schedule so you can feel the benefits of completing what you start.  Enjoy feeling accomplished, successful, and free.  You can always build your schedule up again if you need or want to in a few days or weeks.  Remember, you are the boss of your own time, so be a great boss.

5.  Use your evening time well. There is much ado lately about using our early morning hours well, but I have always thought the evening hours deserve recognition too.  Reflect on the day’s events at night time and make another game plan for the next day.  If you had to deal with procrastination or another type of interruption in your work, do a few minutes of what you originally planned to do.  Those few minutes of actively dealing with your work at night will set you up for greater productivity the next day.

6.  Forgive yourself quickly to recover more quickly.  You simply lost track of time.  You were busy.  You really meant to get more done.  It is okay.  Any of the reasons you lost track of time have got to be okay because now that time is in the past.  Gone.  Done.  Move forward again, the way you had wanted to.  You can still do it.  Remember, no drama needed.

There are many ways to get back on track after an interruption, so feel free to build your own set of trusty tricks and tips too.  Remember to be kind to yourself no matter what situation you find yourself in as that always makes everything easier to get through.

Want to try something new?

I’ve designed the One Page Personal Plan to help you make good on your intentions to get your important tasks and goals accomplished.  The One Page Personal Plan consists of sections for goal-setting and tracking your progress as well.  To get your free copy, please click the button below:

Please share this post if you feel it might be helpful to someone you know.  Thank you!

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What You Need to Know to Stop Procrastinating

What you need to know to stop procrastinatingWhat in the world do we have to do to stop procrastinating?

Procrastination is super sneaky and annoying.

None of us wants to procrastinate routinely, but many of us get trapped into the never-ending cycle of delay – stress – embarrassment – sleep deprivation – delay – stress – embarrassment – sleep deprivation.  We’re so spent it feels like we have no energy to do other things — especially new ventures which require creativity and clear thinking.

So why is it so easy to fall into a cycle of procrastination, yet so hard to escape from it?

Our false beliefs about how to get things done may be the reason we can never seem to stop procrastinating.  The following is a quick list of 5 common myths about productivity that tend to keep us wedded to procrastination:

What You Need to Know to Stop Procrastinating

Which of these 5 assumptions do you tend to make?  Keep tabs on yourself after reading them to make sure these false ideas don’t block you from being productive in the future.

  1. I need to be very anxious in order to good work.  We are taught as early as elementary school that doing good work is a good thing.  As we make our way through middle school and high school, our work becomes more complex, but so do our feelings about doing that work.  Somewhere on that journey through high school, we become anxious about a paper, exam, or grade, and then, lo and behold, we end up associating our work with stress.  We start feeling stressed before we work.  We can even feel stressed at just the idea of working.  And that is where procrastination walks in the door.  At first, it is an innocent delay, but then procrastination becomes more of a routine reaction to work.  So what’s the answer to this problem?  Realize you do not need to be stressed out to do good work.  We may actually do our best work when our minds and bodies are clear of stress and anxiety.  The next time you have an assignment or project you need to get done, decide what your first steps should be and get those done without creating extra emotional drama and distress.
  2. My work represents my value in and to the world.  This particular myth is probably the single greatest cause of procrastination.  When we believe our work somehow represents our value as a person in the world, our work becomes more than just work — it takes on too great a significance as the concrete symbol of how good or bad we are as people.  No wonder people refuse to finish their work and choose procrastination instead!  The good news is our work is not a full measure of our value as human beings.  It is not even close.  The solution to feeling this way?  The next time you have to get work done, address the work and what the work needs from you.  Don’t demand that the work reflect your value as a person.  Keep it simple, straightforward, and do your best, but don’t overwork it in any way.
  3. All of my work needs to be done perfectly.  This is a variation of item #2.  When we attach our self-worth to our work, we then force ourselves to make everything we produce top-notch.  If we don’t, then we risk facing blows to our self-esteem.  But again, our work does not represent who we are or what we are worth.  So how do you deal with your perfectionistic tendencies?  Do good work but make sure you don’t sacrifice your well-being in the process.  Push away any thoughts about how other people might react to your work.  They are going to have a reactions, but those are not yours to control.  Let your work stand for itself.
  4. I have to keep my problems getting things done hidden from other people.  When we feel badly about our actions, we try to keep them secret from other people.  Our intentions are pure, but we feel the need to isolate ourselves from people around us because we feel ashamed.  Problem is, when we become socially isolated, our procrastination takes over even more powerfully.  We no longer have someone to talk with, someone to alert to our difficulty, someone who can remind us everything will be okay.  Since procrastination blooms in an atmosphere of isolation, make sure you take specific action to reconnect with the people in your life.  Doing so will re-energize you and help you to regain your natural motivation.
  5. I will always feel shame and embarrassment about my procrastination, so there’s no payoff for trying to change my ways.  Thinking that we will never be able to stop procrastinating causes us to feel very negatively about ourselves.  This negativity prevents us from reaching out to others for support or advice or help.  It also makes the pressure we feel about our unfinished work even greater.  The good news is the idea that we have to remain in a shamed and embarrassed state forever is a big lie.  As soon as we make the decision to do anything within our power to move forward, the positive feelings begin to flow in.  If you feel stuck because of negative feelings, make sure you speak with someone who can help you feel better again as soon as possible.

So, are you ready to stop procrastinating yet?

When we realize the ideas that keep rattling around in our heads are erroneous, we get a little more courageous when it comes to fighting the impulse to procrastinate.

We decide we are going to keep our work:

  • simple
  • stress-free
  • good enough (and not “perfect”)
  • connected with the people who need to see our work
  • guilt- and shame-free

Sound good to you?  I thought so.

Adjust your mindset in order to get the things you need to get done done.  If you cannot at this time, please do not worry.  After all, worry is the whole reason procrastination is so powerfully addictive and why it so often seems like the best idea in town. Take the time to develop a more positive mindset, to feel less afraid about what work and working means to your self-esteem, and to have real patience and kindness for yourself.

It is possible for you to stop procrastinating soon.  It will be worth your extra effort.

Related reading:

What is the Most Important Factor for Consistent Productivity?

25 Questions to Help You Make Positive Changes in Your Life

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How to Boost Your Mindset and Motivation

How to Boost Your Mindset and Motivation

I have learned over years of coaching and counseling many clients, that it is of utmost importance to understand the nature of a person’s mindset before trying to help them with anything else.  Without knowing what kind of mindset the client has and understanding how it operates, any efforts at behavior change will likely fall flat, or worse, be demoralizing and lead to even more frustration for the client.  

Taking a hard look at our mindset can be a tricky affair though.  We believe, in our heart of hearts, we are trying our best to keep ourselves at our best.  That makes it difficult for us to see how we might be blocking our own progress with the negative messages we sometimes give ourselves.

Here are some questions to ask yourself if you’re curious about what your mindset has been doing for you:

  1. What messages am I telling myself? 
  2. How am I coaching myself — to succeed or to avoid failing?
  3. What kind of mindset to I possess — a positive, forward-looking mindset or a negative, fear-based mindset?
  4. What kind of future am I predicting for myself?  
  5. What factors in my past have caused me to feel the need to coach myself in this way?
  6. What do I fear when I think about letting go of my current negative mindset?  What do I think is going to happen?

Often the answers to the questions above are pretty frightening.  Frighteningly negative, that is.

For instance, the internal coaching conversation might sound something like this:

“Although you were a star student when you were younger, things have gotten a lot more competitive.  Your work better be better than you can even imagine before you put it out there.”

“If I finish my work and submit it, then I might actually confirm what I have been fearing all along — that I am not good enough, and that I am definitely not as talented as my friends clearly are.”

“I need to deal with myself incredibly harshly because that has gotten me far in the past.  I don’t know if I could even get anything done if I stopped being so self-critical.”

“I don’t really know what will happen if I change my way of doing things.  I’m too afraid to find out.”

The general tone of these conversations is strongly negative.  It also feels as if the conversations can only go one way — down into deeper negativity.  It is no wonder we can’t make new changes, get our work done, or concentrate well when we are steeped in negative thinking about ourselves and our future.  It would seem as if we lacked motivation, when really we’re just scared to act on our motivation.

A negative mindset insists that we keep ourselves rooted in anxiety and fear.  There’s little hope for real progress and growth when the negative mindset dominates our thinking.

The good news is, if you have a negative mindset, there are great ways to start looking at your situation in a fresh light.  Here are a few options:

  1. Read a book to be influenced by others’ experiences.  One book you might start with is The Secret from Rhonda Byrnes.  This is a book I recommend to clients who are mired in negative thinking and can’t seem to find another way.  The messages in The Secret tend to make you worried about having a negative mindset any longer.
  2. Find a simple place to start.  Since negative thinking tends to cause us to feel burdened, we need to find a simpler way of getting things done so we can feel the benefits of being active again.  You could take a quick walk around the block.  You could decide to study outside your apartment.  You could set a small goal that will take 15 minutes and get that goal accomplished.  Don’t let your thinking block you from the things you can do very easily and well.  
  3. Do something for someone else.  Send a text message to check in on a friend.  Meet up with someone for a quick lunch for fun.  Just get out of your own head.  Chances are you’ll find a more positive outlook if you do.  
  4. Declare a restart.  Remember that at any point of the year, month, week, or day, you can decide to do things a little bit differently.  No one has to know you are about to do a total reboot.  Just you.
  5. Find support.  If you feel like you are caught in your negative thinking pattern for the long haul, I urge you to seek support.  Time is too precious a thing to waste, and your life and sense of well-being are worth whatever efforts you might need to make to reclaim them.  Find a therapist or coach, mentor, or friend who might be able to lend their expertise and support to you while you figure out the best way to move ahead.  

There are so many options for you.  Unfortunately, it sometimes seems easier to stay hidden undercover where no one can find you than to show up as yourself.  It can feel too overwhelming to make changes even though you know you need and want to make them.

I want to assure you that your desire to feel better about yourself is the positive message you should be listening most closely too.  The internal knowing you naturally have will keep you grounded and safe as you go.  It will guide you into the new territory, both externally and internally, you’ve been meaning to see.

Before you go:

The Freedom from Procrastination Membership Program

If you are interested in receiving support from me in your efforts to combat Procrastination, I encourage you to consider joining me in my Freedom from Procrastination Membership Program.  The Membership Program has been up and running smoothly for about 3 months, and through it I’ve learned that the twin superpowers of having accountability and community can really supercharge everyone’s ability to make the changes they need to make.  For more information about the Membership Program, please read more here.

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Develop Your Zone of Comfort

Feel Well There’s been a lot written about the importance of pushing past your “comfort zone” in order to do creative work, and to be productive in general.  Sometimes that idea helps me, other times it just doesn’t feel right for me.  I’m not really a Rambo-type of personality, and thank goodness most days I don’t need to be like Rambo.

The idea came to me this morning, that for many Procrastinators, instead of pushing our boundaries, we may need to develop our comfort zones more actively.  The idea came to me as I was sipping my warm rice wine and boiled egg soup breakfast, my secret concoction for feeling ready to take on any day.  You see, I was in my comfort zone.

I truly believe if we do not feel well, we cannot work well.  And oftentimes, it is our responsibility to create the opportunities to remind ourselves that we are well, that we can continue to be well, and that the day ahead will be manageable come what may. If you are lacking in the experience of feeling comfort and find yourself locked in zones of stress, I suggest you consider making some of the following zones a reality:

  • a place in your home for privacy
  • a shelf on your bookshelf for reminders or memories of a loved one
  • a breakfast that reliably makes you feel healthy and awesome
  • a nook or corner to sit for a few minutes and read or meditate daily
  • a wall or vision board of images and quotes you select for the inspiration you need
  • a secret project you tend to everyday, like knitting a hip and trendy shawl #shawljustisnotatrendywordbutdoesconnotecomfort

Sometimes productivity requires aggressive planning and action.  But sometimes productivity gets blocked when we try too hard, worrying about being perfect and about feeling ashamed of what we do.  Let’s not forget that productivity may also be the result of daily, calm, and focused effort.  Namaste.

What do you use or have as a zone of comfort?  Do you have plans to make one?  Are you more like Rambo than I am?  Please share your experiences with us by replying here.

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