How to Perform at Your Best Even When You Have Anxiety

Hpw to Perform at Your Best Even When You Have AnxietyWhen I do coaching or psychotherapy with clients who struggle with procrastination, I almost always end up discussing the topic of anxiety.  Anxiety causes us to doubt our natural abilities, making us more vulnerable to procrastination and a whole host of other fears.

Anxiety is present when we fear:

  • moving forward
  • falling behind
  • never feeling good about ourselves or our work
  • never accomplishing our most significant goals because of the small stuff in the way
  • failing to reach our potential

We all need to learn to co-exist with our anxiety.  Anxiety will never totally go away because we need it to alert us to discomfort and danger.  But we need to build our awareness about how anxiety works in order to maintain a feeling of safety and consistency within ourselves.  We can do this through a daily practice of being mindful of what brings us stress and making sure we take enough action to keep our stress at manageable (and hopefully low) levels.

How to Perform at Your Best Even When You Have Anxiety

Here’s a straightforward plan to keep you steer clear of anxiety-fueled chaos:

1. Avoid seeing all of your undone tasks and unfinished things as one big pile.

Instead of ruminating over how much you have to do, start to tease out what it is that you need to do.  Do not take everything on your plate and turn it into a dark cloud trailing you around town all day.  It is more difficult to tackle everything than it is to tackle something.  When we have too many things to do, getting something done can be a huge plus.

My favorite tool for keeping my to do list manageable is the Trello app.  Take a few minutes today to try it out.  I think you’ll find it helpful for avoiding to do list overwhelm.

Related reading: 5 Secret Uses of the Trello App to Overcome Procrastination and Boost Productivity

2. Write everything down.

When we see what we need to do on paper, we can start to make a realistic plan for how to get the details taken care of.  When we just sit with the anxiety and start to freak out, we reduce our odds of being able to do anything at all. 

Take a small, doable section of your plan and write out your plan of attack.  When will you start?  How much time will you allow yourself to take?  What pieces of this plan can you put down on paper right away?  Don’t even think about the rest of the plan until you finish the first part.

I highly recommend you download a copy of the Emergent Task Planner to get your plan of action laid out.  It’s an elegant one-page planning sheet to help you sort out how you’d like your next day to go.

Related resource: The Emergent Task Planner

3. Be patient with yourself. 

When we are in a period of overwhelm, it is easy to feel drained and frustrated.  Frustration makes It easy to give up on our efforts to move things forward.  When we are feeling overwhelmed, we need to invest our efforts into having more compassion towards ourselves. 

Yelling at yourself will just make matters worse. 

Flinging your papers into the air will just make a mess. 

Believing in yourself and allowing yourself to move forward, despite your doubts and fears, will make everything better.

Instead of giving into the negative feelings, start to coach yourself into getting the next step done.  Relax your high expectations.  Have faith this period of difficulty will be temporary and will soon be over.

4. Focus on your WHY

Anxiety tends to crop up when we attempt projects that are most meaningful to us.  Anxiety also arises when we are trying to do something new.  Keeping our focus on WHY we are doing these new projects is one of the best ways to handle the anxiety that is competing for our attention. 

What is your WHY?  Your WHY might be:

  • your purpose in life
  • using your natural talents to help others
  • making the people you care about feel safe and loved
  • doing your best with the resources you have
  • finding new ways to solve old problems
  • enjoying each day fully

Our ability to change our perspective to get us through difficult times is a tremendous skill. Make sure you remember to use your own ability to reflect and to shift your mindset next time you feel you’re about to give in to your anxiety.

Recommended viewing: How Great Leaders Inspire Action TED Talk by Simon Sinek

5.  Remember that you are limitless

Anxiety forces us to focus on small quantities.  Anxiety forces us to focus on what we are afraid of, which can be a small fraction of what we might actually achieve.  Anxiety reminds us that we have limits and tries to make us believe we are about to mess those limits up.  Anxiety gives us a distorted view of what is really going on.  We can never see things for what they are when we are anxious.

So the next time you feel drained by your anxiety, focus on your abilities and potential instead.  Each and every one of us has the ability and the potential to succeed despite intense feelings of anxiety.  It is in our nature to do so. 

Man on a Wire is my all-time favorite movie.  I guarantee you will take a closer look at what you can accomplish with your one life after watching this remarkable story.

Recommended viewing: Man on a Wire

What’s next?

Why shrink ourselves down to smaller versions of what we might be?  Instead of quaking in our boots, let’s take a breath and move forward into what we might be.  Anxiety will have nothing on us.  And, instead of anxiety, we will be filled with different types of feelings, like joy, pride, satisfaction, and contentment. 

Let’s go.

Before you go

I’ve created a free download containing my top 5 tips for being able to stay on track even when you are feeling anxious.  Click the button below to get this list of helpful tips:

Get “THE 5 SECRETS FOR STAYING CLEAR OF FEAR” download now

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7 Techniques to Save YouTime and to Keep You Organized

Use these simple techniques to save yourself time and hassle throughout the day.How do we deal with the seeming onslaught of to-do’s?  How do we prevent ourselves from falling into the same old time-wasting traps?

Sometimes it can feel like we might never get caught up, and indeed, our lives may be so full that we may never get caught up.  Strategizing how we are going to manage tasks and time demands can help us to remain calm and composed throughout the day.  Put in a few minutes to prep in order to save yourself many more minutes later.

Here is a sampling of some techniques I’ve found useful in giving me a leg up during busy times:

1.  Use the proper system for your tasks.  Any task that you do routinely will likely have a timesaving system you could think of and implement.  For instance you could:

  • get a pill case to store medications, vitamins, and supplements you need to take in order to save yourself the stress of forgetting and to keep yourself in your best physical condition
  • have a recycle bin on hand when you are sorting your mail to keep you from having to clean your mail piles down the road and to keep your surfaces clear of clutter
  • have a consistent system for jotting down notes, reminders, and appointments to increase your efficiency and to decrease your error rate
  • plan and pack healthy lunch snacks at the beginning of the week to make it easier for you to get out the door in the morning, to save money, and to feel well

2.  Develop your own best system for handling e-mail tasks.  We each have our own individual relationship with having to manage e-mail.  Take a few minutes to decide what your management method could look like.  Here are some suggestions:

  • reply immediately to e-mails whenever possible in order to get them out of your way
  • if there is a task associated with the e-mail, promptly determine a time and date for the task and enter it into your schedule or in a task management app such as Trello
  • reduce the time you spend crafting your reply.  Keep your message on-point, simple, and direct.  By doing so, you will save the person you’re communicating with some time too.

3.  Say “No” to activities that don’t fit into your schedule or that don’t align with your plans.  When we act with the Fear Of Missing Out and impulsively jump in and out of activities other people think we should do, we can end up overwhelmed and unmotivated.  Clear your mind by clearing the junk out of your schedule.

4.  Determine what your priority and mantra for the day will be.  Knowing what your single priority for the day is will help you to differentiate between good and bad decisions throughout the day.  Developing a mantra or a self-encouraging statement to support that priority item can further enhance your chances of success.

To illustrate, a priority I have for tomorrow is to focus on some unfinished business for my psychology practice.  Having that as my priority will allow me to steer clear of other tasks I could be doing, like checking in with social media.  My mantra for keeping my eyes on my business goals might be “I’ll feel relief when these business tasks are completed.”

What will your priority and mantra look like?

5.  Plan for the future in small ways.  Use micro-movements to protect yourself from unneeded hassles.  Some examples are:

  • making sure to keep your gas tank at least a quarter full
  • keeping extras of the tools and home goods you use and love the most so you don’t have to waste time running out when you run out
  • communicating ahead of time about meet-ups, pickups, reservations, and events

6.  Set policies and expectations for interactions in your home.  There’s no reason to bicker incessantly at home, a place that should support your sense of calm.  Take a few minutes to lay down some policies for things like:

  • bathroom etiquette
  • chore and cleaning routines
  • timely, open, and honest communication and respect

7.  Plan ahead.  This is not an easy technique for Procrastinators, who tend to be looking at the past rather than towards the future.  That is why this technique is so powerful. When we look to the future, we can sense possibility and we can have a role in creating it.  Some things you can plan are:

  • an exit from a not-good situation
  • an exercise milestone, e.g. 6 days of exercise per month
  • a meet-up date with a friend you haven’t seen in two years
  • a summer getaway

Bonus Material:

I’ve put together a planning sheet to save you the time of having to make one up for yourself.  The ALWAYS PREPARED planning sheet is a compilation of many of the tips I’ve listed above.  It’s meant to help you save time and get organized each day, but the intention is also to remind you to do some things that will help make the tomorrow better too.

Click here to receive the ALWAYS PREPARED planning sheet to help you get on your way today!

There are more techniques than there is time in the day.  Choose the ones that look good to you and try them out.  Develop ones of your own that suit you and bring you the most freedom and flexibility.

The more time you rescue from waste, distraction, and overwhelm, the more time you will have to savor, thrive, and enjoy the way you want to.

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